If neither the trustee, nor any creditor objects to the debtor’s discharge, the bankruptcy court will automatically give the debtor a discharge at some point after the last day to object. The last day to file a complaint objecting to a debtor’s discharge is 60 days after the first session of the Meeting of Creditors. If no complaint is filed, the discharge is usually entered several days later. The discharge prevents creditors from attempting to collect any debt against the debtor, personally, that arose prior to the filing of the bankruptcy. Thus, for all intents and purposes, the discharge effectively wipes out debts.

However, it is important to note that not all debts are dischargeable, including, but not limited to certain taxes and child or spousal support obligations.

Furthermore, a bankruptcy discharge is personal. This means that a creditor can still collect on a discharged debt from a co-debtor that did not file for bankruptcy.


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